Land Steward Profiles

Private Land Stewardship Program participants engage in a variety of stewardship activities. To learn more about what your neighbors are doing to preserve the Hopewell Valley, click on a name below.

participants table

Chris Berry lives on a 3.4 acre parcel near the Stony Brook Millstone Watershed Reserve. Chris is a very active volunteer for FoHVOS, Stony Brook Millstone Watershed Association and D&R Greenway Land Trust. Chris is a FoHVOS board member. Over the last five years, he has proven to be excellent land steward. Here are a few of his accomplishments: installed deer fencing, replaced lawn with meadows, planted many native species, installed solar panels, signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge" and inventoried the flora of his property and entered it into the Bowman's Hill Plant Stewardship Index database to track the success of their efforts. The improvements to the ecological health became quickly obvious as unique native plants such as ragged fringed orchid "appeared out of nowhere".

Barbara and Tom Berry live on 6.6 acres in the Sourlands. Their primarily forested land is managed through a Forest Stewardship Plan, which includes forestry activity that is especially sensitive to ecological values. Tom carries out invasive species control on his land to improve forest health. They will be adding native plants into their landscape, restoring an area currently infested by Japanese Stiltgrass and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Barbara Bingham and Maya Kollman live on 1 acre near Mercer Meadows. Their land is nestled in an oak/hickory forest and contains a small pond that is home to frogs and turtles. Their approach has been to respect the land and allow the forest to grow around them. They are considering reducing the size of their lawn through native plantings. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Kim and Michael Bruno live on a 2.8 acre parcel in the Harbourton portion of the Hopewell Valley. Kim serves on the FoHVOS board. They have created a number of garden beds under trees to reduce their lawn area and sought out our program for advice on native plants and tackling a dense thicket containing many invasive species located at the back of their property. Kim and Michael will be installing native species in their garden, including converting an infested portion of their property to native grasses, wildflowers and shrubs to provide food and habitat for birds. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Debra and James Burd live on 1.4 acres in the southern portion of the Hopewell Valley. The Burd's raise honey bees and plan to convert a portion of their lawn to wildflower meadow to support bees and other pollinators. They have allowed access to search for newly emerging invasive species on their land and will be controlling widespread weeds such as Japanese Honeysuckle. The Burd's have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Capital Health owns 170 acres in southern Hopewell Township. Their campus was designed with many environmentally friendly features and they continually practice sound land stewardship. Highlights of design features include LEED architecture, collection of rain water for irrigation, a variety of energy efficient designs, and parking lot bioswales and rooftop gardens to minimize and filter runoff. Instead of extensive manicured lawns, the landscape features wildflower meadows, providing habitat and a serene walking environment. Their designed gardens avoid the use of invasive species and over 1,000 native trees were planted on the campus.

Meg Carsky-Wilson lives on 0.7 acres in Hopewell Borough. She has been removing invasive species such as large Norway Maples and tangles of Japanese Honeysuckle. Meg is converting a large lawn area to wildflower meadow, resulting in 0.2 acres of excellent habitat. She has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species.

Tyler Christensen lives on 110 acres in the Mt. Rose area of the Hopewell Valley. The property has high ecological value with mature forest containing vernal pools utilized by salamanders for breeding. There are nearly 13 acres of fields being converted to wildflower meadows by mowing in fall/winter rather than during the growing season, which will provide significant habitat for native plants and animals. He has become part of the FoHVOS Kestrel Conservation Program, allowing a nest box to be installed and monitored throughout the spring and summer. Deer management activities will be conducted in cooperation with neighboring land owners to improve ecological health. Early detection and rapid response to newly emerging invasive species will be conducted in conjunction with FoHVOS. He has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Kristina Clark lives on 4 acres in the Woodsville section of Hopewell. Her landscaping includes native species and she has recently installed a very large meadow that will provide beauty and support a diverse group of pollinators. Kristina is also tackling invasive vines that threaten large trees throughout her property. Importantly, she will be allowing highly effective hunters to reduce the deer population on her property, which will likely provide benefits to the surrounding area.

Laurie and Glenn Cleveland live on 3.3 acres in the Sourlands. They have being practicing land stewards for years by controlling invasive species such as Multiflora Rose and planting a variety of native species including wetland species within and along a large pond. They have also allowed bow hunting on their property. They are currently adding more native species to enhance existing plantings and installing a large wildflower meadow. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Katherine and Kate Dresdner live on 3 acres in Hopewell Township. They have plans to dramatically improve the ecological health of their new property. They will be planting a wildflower meadow over their septic field and new garden beds will feature native plants. Hedgerows of small native trees, shrubs and perennials will be created along the fence line. Milkweed will be featured to provide reproductive habitat for the monarch butterfly. Large canopy trees will be planted to ultimately convert lawn to forest habitat. They obtained a variance from the Township for the deer management fencing to allow native plants to grow without being browsed by deer. FoHVOS will assist with the treatment of newly emerging invasive species on the property and they have signed the "Landscape Planting Pledge".

The Evanini family lives on 0.1 acres in Pennington Borough. Their backyard features a selection of mature native trees. They are considering adding a hedgerow of native shrubs for privacy. They have reclaimed a portion of their yard from English ivy, painstakingly removing it by hand.

Tim and Rachel Fedor live on and operate a 62-acre horse farm known as the Duncraven Stables. Their fields and surrounding habitat along the Hopewell / West Amwell border have been identified as excellent potential habitat for the American Kestrel, a small falcon that has been declining in New Jersey. They have become part of the FoHVOS Kestrel Conservation Program, allowing a nest box to be installed and monitored throughout the spring and summer. They will also native plants at their home.

James Gambino lives on a 0.8 acre parcel in southern Hopewell Township. Jim is a very active FoHVOS volunteer, serves on the Township's Environmental Commission and Deer Management Advisory Committee, and has volunteered for over 15 years with the Stony Brook Millstone Watershed Association's StreamWatch program (and is also a member of the Watershed's 'River Friendly Program'). He supports the local flora and fauna of the Valley through his landscaping, including the installation of a hand dug pond and use of native plants. Jim has reduced his lawn area by 15%, practices organic lawn care and gardening, installs numerous bird houses, composts, and conserves water through the use of rain barrels. He has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge". Jim fosters the growth of native trees that appear on his property, which he donates to local restoration efforts.

Jennifer Ghannam lives on a 0.25 acre parcel in Hopewell Borough. She has created a native plant garden in her backyard which is home to a diverse array of butterflies. She is adding additional shade-loving native plants to reduce the size of her lawn. She is the owner of a nature-oriented toyshop in Hopewell Borough called Sticks and Stones (www.sticksandstonesshop.com).

Deborah and David Gainer live on 1.3 acres in Titusville. They have planted native species such as Sweet Pepperbush and have begun adding many more to their home landscape. Deborah and David will be reducing the size of their lawn in a hard-to-mow area. In addition, they will be allowing a portion of their lawn, which backs up to a large amount of protected open space, to be converted to meadow consisting of native wildflowers and grasses. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Christina and David Glogoff live on a one acre parcel in Pennington Borough. David serves on the FoHVOS board. Hurricane Sandy and other recent storms caused several large trees to fall, causing large changes to their landscape. They have a number of planting beds, which they plan to fill with native plants utilizing a formal design to match their existing landscaping - because their property is fenced and free of deer, the full palette of native plants is available to them. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Sophie and Curtis Glovier live on 8 acres in Princeton. Sophie has created beautiful gardens featuring many native plants at her home and has been controlling invasive species through mowing. She will be working with FoHVOS to enhance a meadow and restoring the edge of her pond with native wildflowers and shrubs that are resistant to deer. Sophie has allowed FoHVOS to perform a search and implement control efforts for newly emerging invasive species. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Carlton and Sharon Gonsalves live on 0.7 acres in the Mt. Rose area of the Hopewell Valley. They have recently moved to their new home and are planning to incorporate native plants, including large canopy trees, into their landscaping. Plantings will include native trees, shrubs and wildflowers to provide beauty and function (e.g., screening, edible fruits). They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Judith Graber and Paul Kuehnert live on 0.8 acres in Hopewell Borough. They recently moved to the Valley and have begun to revive their landscaping through the removal of invasive species and installation of native plants to create habitat for birds and pollinators. Portions will be formal plantings, while other areas will be maintained as patches of wildflower meadow. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge" and are willing to help volunteer to help other private land stewards.

Werner Graf and his two daughters live on an 11-acre parcel within the Sourlands. His property is primarily forested, with slopes heading down toward the headwaters of the Beden Brook. Werner has installed extensive stone retaining walls which prevent soil erosion, silting, and further degradation to several large beech and elm trees. The stone work beautifies the entire property, providing recreational seating and scenic overlooks while serving a critical ecological function. Werner will be installing native plants within garden beds and has signed the FoHOVS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Bonita Craft Grant lives on 3.1 acres in the Hopewell Valley. She incorporated native plants into the garden around the home. She has worked to remove invasive plants from their land.

Diane and Ted Griffith live on 5 acres in the Sourlands, which has a conservation easement to prevent future development. Ted put up deer fencing around their home over 20 years ago and the response has been lush growth of a diversity of native forest wildflowers throughout! They have also been controlling invasive species in forest areas outside of the fencing. Newly emerging species will be mapped and controlled by FoHVOS staff. They utilize native species in their gardens and have signed the FoHVOS' "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Mary and Brian Gross live on 0.4 acres in the Princeton Farms area. They have extensive garden beds and meadow habitat that has replaced significant amounts of lawn. They have planted deer-resistant native species in their landscape (e.g., Virginia Sweetspire) and plan to add others, while removing invasive species such as Chinese Silvergrass. They have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Carol and John Jackson live on 0.5 acres in Pennington Borough. John serves as the Board President for FoHVOS. The Jacksons have a landscape with numerous planting beds that minimize lawn areas. However, deer have made it very difficult to completely fill those beds with plants. Native plants that are resistant to deer will be utilized to provide both beauty and habitat. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge" and will remove newly emerging invasive species such as Chinese Silvergrass from their landscaping.

Erica Johanson lives on a 24 acre parcel within the Sourland region, which harbors the largest contiguous forest in the northern Piedmont. Erica has been a very active land steward. She allows the hunting of deer on her property along with several other important stewardship efforts. Erica has converted ½ acre of lawn to native wildflower meadow and has a Certified Wildlife Garden by the National Wildlife Federation and she has signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge". She also removed ½ acre of bamboo and replaced it with native shrubs and will be installing a rain garden to catch runoff from her roof. Her property harbors a vernal pool, which she had registered/certified with the NJDEP. Erica gave permission for the New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team to search her property for newly emerging invasive species -- when Japanese Wisteria was found, she funded its removal to protect the forests' ecological health. Erica's forest now provides improved bat roosting habitat through a stewardship partnership with the US Fish & Wildlife Service and Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey. FoHVOS performed a rapid ecological assessment of her property and will support her ongoing stewardship efforts.

Marjorie Kaplan and Frank Sweeney live on 0.5 acres in Pennington Borough. They will be using native plants to fill a problem area that is seasonally wet and creating a diverse forest understory garden to provide beauty and serve native pollinators in a drier location. They have also signed the FoHVOS' "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Caroline Katmann lives on 4.3 acres in the Sourlands and serves as the Executive Director for the Sourland Planning Council. She has significantly minimized the amount of mowing on her property and has planted many native species in her landscape to support wildlife. She has selectively controlled particular invasive species. Caroline will be restoring a former lawn area to a wet meadow by installing patches of native wildflowers. She has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Judith Karp lives on a 1.4 acre parcel in the Elm Ridge Park section of the Hopewell Valley. Judy serves as the FoHVOS Development Director. She plans to utilize native species in a variety of landscape areas. A particularly invasive Wisteria vine (literally taking down their fence one picket at a time!) will be removed. She has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Mohamed Kilany and his wife Julianne Hallenbeck live on 6.4 acres in the Sourlands.. He has been a very active steward of his land for many years. The majority of his yard is maintained as a beautiful and ecologically valuable meadow. Mohamed has also made great progress in reducing invasive species such as mile-a-minute, autumn olive and multifloral rose throughout his property. He will also be allowing FoHVOS to search for and treat any newly emerging invasive species on his property. Importantly, he will be allowing highly effective hunters to reduce the deer population on his property, which will likely provide benefits to the surrounding area. Mohamed has also signed the FoHVOS' "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Carol Kleis and Rex Parker live on a 1.9 acre parcel in Titusville. Both Carol and Rex are involved with efforts to protect Hopewell Valleys environment including the Environmental Commission and Open Space Advisory Committee. Carol also serves on the FoHVOS board and with the Mercer County Master Gardeners. They have planted many native species on their property and have converted a significant portion of lawn to wildflower meadow, which abuts a large protected open space. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Mark and BJ Kennedy live on 2.5 acres s near the Stony Brook. They tend their gardens and the wild areas of their property to provide habitat for birds and pollinators. They have allowed a portion of their lawn to become naturalized. Native plants are welcome in their gardens, and they plan to add more to formal areas and to further naturalize along a Stony Brook tributary that flows on their land. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Paul Kinney and Lisa Wolff live on 1.7 acres in the Elm Ridge area. Their property is largely forested with many mature native trees. They have converted trouble areas (e.g., too shady or damp) within their lawn to garden beds and plan to continue this effort utilizing native species and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge". Paul and Lisa successfully convinced bats to move from their attic to a nearby bat house!

Marian Labos lives on 0.4 acres in Hopewell Borough. She has minimized portions of her lawn through the maintenance of large garden beds, where she plans to utilize native plants. Marian has taken on control of invasive species that encroach upon her property. She will be installing many native shrubs to provide habitat for birds along her property line. Marian has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Moira and Jack Lawrence live on 28 acres in the Pennington area of the Hopewell Valley. They will be restoring wildflower meadows and shrubland by removing invasive species and planting native species across several abandoned agricultural areas. They have become part of the FoHVOS Kestrel Conservation Program, allowing a nest box to be installed and monitored throughout the spring and summer. Moira and Jack have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge" and have already stopped the use of invasive species in their new landscaping.

Sharyn and Charles Magee live on 5 acres north of Pennington Borough. Sharyn serves on the board of the Washington Crossing Audubon Society. She has made significant contributions to our knowledge of birds through her rigorous surveys over many years, which are submitted to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Sharyn has been a champion of private land stewardship for well over a decade, planting and protecting over 100 native trees and shrubs. The Magees have also begun to allow deer management on their property and will continue planting native species to further enhance wildlife habitat. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Carrie and Josh McLaughlin live on over 1 acre in the Titusville area. They recently moved to Hopewell and have plans to re-vitalize their landscape (which is currently typical lawn grasses) with native plants for beauty and habitat. They will be installing a meadow over their septic field and planting native trees, shrubs, grasses and wildflowers in a number of creative planting beds throughout their property. They have also signed the FoHOVS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Chantal and Phil Meldrum own 212 acres in the Pleasant Valley area. They have an active livestock farm, raising cattle, pigs, sheep, chickens and turkeys – see http://www.pleasantrunfarm.com/. An on-site mill is utilized to create timber products used on the farm. They have an active deer management program to foster forest health. The Meldrums utilize native plants in their landscaping and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge". They are restoring a degraded farm pond, with assistance from FoHVOS staff and volunteers. They also participate with the New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team and have allowed searching and control activities on their property. The property lies within an area with potential to restore populations of the American Kestrel and a nesting box will be installed to help with their conservation.

Pamela Morgan and Tom McGovern live on 4 acres in the Baldpate Mountain Ecosystem. They have done extensive clearing of invasive species that had choked her forested areas (primarily Wineberry). They have also installed a bat house and several bird houses. Pam and Tom are in the process of establishing a meadow-like environment which will support insects, birds and wildlife by incorporating native plants. They are also improving the health of the stream by minimizing mowing along the banks. Their yard has received certification by the National Wildlife Federation as a "Certified Wildlife Habitat". They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Kathleen Nash lives on 0.3 acres in Pennington Borough. She has incorporated native species into her landscape and is continuing to add more to increase the beauty and ecological function of her property. Kathleen has also signed the FoHVOS’ "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Jess Niederer is the owner of Chickadee Creek Farm (www.chickadeecreekfarm.com) located on 60 acres outside of Pennington Borough. She is an organic farmer that grows and locally sells vegetables and herbs. Jess' farming operations are sensitive to the ecological health of the Hopewell Valley. Jess was our first participant in the FoHVOS Kestrel Conservation Program by installing a nest box at her farm.

A large property owner within the Baldpate Mountain Ecosystem has taken important steps to help steward the Hopewell Valley. They have instituted a deer management program that will benefit not only their forests, but forests throughout the Baldpate Mountain area. A planned wildflower meadow restoration on six acres will provide habitat for a variety of native plants and their pollinators, along with providing great beauty. The property lies within an area with potential to restore populations of the American Kestrel and a nesting box was installed to help with their conservation. They also participate with the New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team and have allowed searching and control activities on their property. The landowner has agreed to the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Sarah Orfe lives on 0.5 acres in Titusville. She recently moved into her new home and is planning on incorporating native plants throughout her landscape. Plans include the use of low-growing native shrubs as foundation plantings along with creating attractive 'wildflower garden beds' along fence lines. In addition, she will be controlling invasive species such as Wineberry and Garlic Mustard. Sarah has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Suzie Potts lives on two acres in the Harbourton area. She maintains beautiful manicured gardens including native species. Significant areas of lawn have been converted to wildflower meadow to add habitat and reduce maintenance – these areas will be enhanced through planting of additional native species. A growing infestation of Japanese Wisteria will be removed to prevent further spread to adjacent properties and she has signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Pascale Poussart and Adam Maloof live on 11 acres in Hopewell Township. They have embarked upon a long-term project to rejuvenate the ecological health of their property, which was once used as a dairy farm. Significant efforts to control invasive species have begun – including removal of dense tangles of Multiflora Rose and Autumn Olive. They do not maintain manicured lawns and are instead planning meadow restoration on their septic field and areas near their home and alongside a paddock. Native shrubs and herbs will be planted throughout their natural landscape, which is adjacent to St. Michaels Farm Preserve. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Michelle and Richard Preston live on 76 acres in the Sourlands. They have an active deer management program to foster forest health. The Prestons are in the process of converting a large portion of lawn to wildflower meadow; FoHVOS staff and volunteers will provide support to expand upon their existing efforts. They are also enhancing hedgerows by installing large numbers of native tree and shrub seedlings, including Elderberry, Redbud, Flowering Dogwood and Persimmon. They participate with the New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team and have allowed searching and control activities on their property. In addition, they utilize native plants in their landscaping and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge" The Prestons have installed a nesting box to support the conservation of American Kestrels.

Lillian Rankel and Andy Jackson live on 0.6 acres in Pennington Borough. Andy serves on the FoHVOS board. The Jacksons signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge" and immediately showed their commitment when re-designing their landscaping. Hurricane Sandy decided to remove Butterfly Bush from their yard (a newly recognized invasive species) and the Jackson's decided not to replace it. They will also be installing additional deer-resistant native species to improve habitat.

Patricia Reilly lives on 9.5 acres in the Hopewell Valley. She tends extensive gardens around her home and incorporates native plants in her landscaping. She also worked to remove invasive plants like multiflora rose from the forest and phragmites from her pond.

Glorianne and Anthony Robbi live on 12.7 acres near the Stony Brook. The property is largely forested and pastures provide feeding for grass-fed cows. Native species are utilized throughout their garden beds, providing excellent habitat for birds and butterflies. They have been treating invasive species such as Autumn Olive and planting native trees to improve forest health. Glorianne and Anthony will be continuing to add native species to their landscape and other parts of their property and have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Nancy and Dan Rubenstein live on 0.3 acres in Pennington Borough. They will be enhancing existing garden beds with a variety of deer-resistant native species. Several native shrubs that are badly browsed by deer will be protected within attractive fencing so that they can grow freely, providing habitat and food for birds. In addition, FoHVOS will assist with selective control of invasive species such as English Ivy that threaten mature trees. They are also part of the Stony Brook – Millstone "River Friendly Program" and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Vanessa Sandom and Carl Seiden live on a 4.8 acre parcel in the Harbourton portion of the Hopewell Valley. Vanessa currently serves as Mayor of Hopewell Township. They have replaced over 50% of their lawn area with both formal and naturalistic gardens. Vanessa and Carl will be replacing invasive species in their landscaping (including Chinese Silvergrass, Winged Burning Bush and Butterfly Bush) followed by the addition of native species within a deer exclosed area, especially those struggling to survive heavy deer browse (including Pinxster Azalea, forest herbs). FoHVOS will assist with the conversion of 1/2 acre of lawn to wildflower meadow. They have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species.

Mary Schmidt and Elizabeth Thompson live on a 2 acre parcel in the Sourlands. They understand the value of the Sourlands and strive to improve their portion of the ecosystem. Mary and Elizabeth have taken on ambitious invasive species control efforts including hand pulling garlic mustard over several years. Large specimens of invasive landscape plants have been removed or are slated for removal (including Winged Burning Bush, Kousa Dogwood and Japanese Barberry). Naturally sprouting native trees are protected from deer using metal mesh cages. They have also planted many native species that attract pollinators and birds. Mary and Elizabeth are currently reducing their mowed lawn by about 50% through the planting of even more native plants to create a meadow. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Joan Schwarzwalder lives on 0.5 acres in southern Hopewell Township. Her property contains a nice stream with turtles and other wildlife. Joan plans to plant native species along its banks and within a wet depression in her yard. Native species plantings will protect the stream and provide excellent habitat for a variety of species. Joan has also signed the FoHVOS' "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Martha Sciple lives on 1.5 acres in the Elm Ridge area. She is preparing to incorporate native species into her landscaping. This effort will include improving lake edge habitat with native wildflowers and shrubs. Martha will be converting lawn to meadow and planting native trees and shrubs throughout. She has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Sourlands-area family live on 2.8 acres in the Sourlands. She has an extensive native plant garden around the home. She is continually expanding her meadow, which occupies a site that was formerly lawn. She and her family have worked to remove invasive wisteria vines from their land.

Tina Stork lives on 218 acres in West Amwell known as Fiddler Creek Farm. She cares for horses and has extensive pastures and hay fields on the property, along with forest habitat that protects a beautiful stretch of Moores Creek. A portion of the site is being managed for grassland birds under the guidance of the D&R Greenway Land Trust. Hunters manage the deer herd on the property to help reduce a severely overabundant herd in the area. Tina participates in the FoHVOS’ forest health monitoring program and has allowed searches and control efforts for newly emerging invasive species. She has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Emily Suzuki and Mikey Azzara live on a 1.5 acre parcel in Titusville. They recently moved to their new home and are planning on incorporating native plants throughout their landscape. They will be converting a damp portion of their lawn to a wildflower meadow. In addition, they will be controlling invasive species such as Multifloral Rose and Winged Burning Bush. Emily and Mikey have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Patricia and Raymond Sziber live on a 0.3 acre parcel in Titusville. Pat serves as the Executive Director of FoHVOS and serves with Washington Crossing Audubon Society, Sourland Planning Council and the Hopewell Valley Open Space Advisory Committee. They have made their landscaping extremely welcome to birds and butterflies for many years. Native plants can be found in abundance (and there isnt any room left for more!). They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Robert Tomaselli and Michael Dawson live on 2 acres in the Mt. Rose area. The majority of their property is mature forest and they have recently installed a deer fence, which creates a refuge for many native forest shrubs and herbs that cannot grow elsewhere. They utilize native plants in their landscaping and plan to significantly increase their use now that they can be protected from deer. They have also been improving their forest by removing some of the most threatening invasive shrubs such as Winged Burningbush and Linden Viburnum and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge".

Margret van Vuuren and Scott Chasalow live on a 0.3 acre parcel in Pennington Borough. Margret volunteers as a member of the Hopewell Valley Green Team. Margret and Scott have established a wildflower meadow to replace a portion of their lawn. They continue to seek ways to decrease their lawn through the use of native plants and have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species.

Marie Verna and Michael Kosloski live on 0.5 acres in Titusville. They utilize many garden beds, which reduces lawn area and provides habitat. A stream traversing their property provides excellent wildlife habitat with frogs and snakes very common. They will be converting lawn to wildflower meadow and enhancing the stream banks with additional native plants. In addition, they will be caging young, naturally occurring trees and shrub seedlings from deer browse to allow them to reach maturity and removing the invasive winged burning bush that threatens adjacent preserved open space. They have signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species.

Linda and Kurt Vollherbst live on 2.2 acres. They have eliminated nearly 2/3 of potential lawn area to by allowing fallow farmland to become wildflower meadow, along with planting many native shrubs. They plan to continue adding native plants to their meadows to enhance diversity, beauty and wildlife value. Their meadows, along with installation of nesting boxes, regularly attracts bluebirds, tree swallows and wrens. Linda and Kurt have also selectively controlled invasive species such as Autumn Olive and Common Mugwort. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species.

Robert Wilson lives on 200 acres within the Sourland region of the Hopewell Valley - much of his land is permanently protected from future development through his donated conservation easements. Robert is the owner of Pheasant Hill Vineyard (http://pheasanthillvineyard.com/) - he and his land have produced award winning chardonnay, beating out wines from France and California! Robert supports deer management to improve the ecological health of his lands. He has also restored native grasslands through support from the Natural Resource Conservation Service, who have a variety of programs to improve wildlife habitat on farms. Robert has participated with the New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team by allowing searching and removal of newly emerging invasive species. He also controls widespread invasive species, especially Autumn Olive, which has the ability to infest grasslands. Robert has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge". FoHVOS performed a rapid ecological assessment of his property and will support his ongoing stewardship efforts.

Heather and Nick Wurtz live on 8.9 acres that is primarily forested in the Sourlands. They allow deer management to occur on their property and have a woodland management plan. Heather and Nick have planted many native trees and protected them from deer and will be incorporating native wildflower meadows to replace portions of their lawn. They have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species and will be removing Chinese Silvergrass planted by the previous landowner.

Valerie Young lives on 1.3 acres near the Stony Brook Millstone Watershed Reserve. She has been an active member of the conservation community through her volunteer educational activities at the Watershed and animal rehabilitation work. Valerie has extensive gardens filled with native species throughout her property, including a fantastic woodland garden and creative approaches to minimize deer damage in her landscaping. She has also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species.

Glenda Yu and Robert Hooper live on 3.1 acres in the Sourlands. They have been installing native plants in their landscape and continue to add to the natural diversity in garden beds and forest habitat, including the use of edible plants. FoHVOS will search their property for newly emerging invasive species and assist with removal of winged burning bush that threatens surrounding forest. Glenda and Robert have also signed the FoHVOS "Landscape Planting Pledge", agreeing to avoid purchasing invasive species and will be removing Chinese Silvergrass planted by the previous landowner.

Private Lands Stewardship Program

Fritillary on butterflyweed
Fritillary on butterflyweed

Sundrops, a native wildflower of meadows.
Sundrops, a native wildflower of meadows.

American Kestrel
American Kestrel

Burd Carsky Fedor glovier christensen Berry Bruno Berry Niederer Capital Gainer Gambino glogoff Graber Gross Rankel Jackson Johanson Karp Katmann Kleis Labos lawrence Magee Meldrum Resident orfe potts Preston Robbi Sandom Schmidt Sciple Suzuki sziber van Verna Vollherbst Wilson Wurtz Young yu Ghannam kennedy mclaughlin rubenstien kinney 2016/2017 Deer Management Program and Public Access Limitations tax incentive program Baldpate Mountain Forest Stewardship Plan