FoHVOS Trails
Skyview Meadow

Elks Trail Volunteers
Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space is dedicated to providing public access on our nature preserves. Our trails bring opportunities for passive recreation to residents throughout the Hopewell Valley. Our trails wander through a wide range of habitats-from forests to meadows, near streams and along farm fields.

Additionally, our trails are built and maintained with the assistance of volunteers.

FoHVOS nature preserves are open during daylight hours for hiking and nature study. No fires, vehicles or trapping are permitted. Except as required by law, motorized vehicles are not allowed. Hunting is allowed by written permission only. Please note that our trails are closed when hunting is in progress. Specific dates are posted at the preserve entrance and our website.

Look for FoHVOS Nature Preserve signs placed at preserve entrances.

Additional information about our trails and other trails in the Hopewell Valley can be found in the recently published Guide to Walking Trails in the Hopewell Valley (5 MB). To receive a print version, please email trailguide@fohvos.org.

Click here to see a map of our preserves and easements with trails.

Eames Preserve: 1.2 mile loop

Eames Preserve: 1.2 mile loop Location: Harbourton-Woodsville Road, approximately two miles east of Trenton-Harbourton Road (Route 579). Interactive directions

The Eames Preserve trail begins along an old farm road and passes through a mature deciduous forest and a meadow. A highlight along the trail is a lowland that fills with skunk cabbage and spring wildflowers like false Solomon's seal. Listen for woodland birds as you hike through the mature beech forest. Portions of this trail are rocky with a moderate grade.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Elks Preserve: 1.2 mile loop

Elks Preserve: 1.2 mile loop Location: Crusher Road, approximately one quarter mile south of Pennington-Hopewell Road (Route 654). Interactive directions

The Elks Preserve trail takes you through a maturing red maple forest and red cedar thickets. Notice the "wolf trees" - which once were grown in the open and are now surrounded by a returning forest. Elks Preserve is home to an expanding patch of princess pine and other native plants such as arrowwood viburnum.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Heritage Preserve: 1.5 mile loop

Heritage Preserve: 1.5 mile loop Location: Reed Road, approximately one mile south of Washington Crossing-Pennington Road (Route 546). Interactive directions

Heritage Preserve trail tours succession from meadow to mature forest and features native plant species from lowland and upland habitats. Heritage Preserve is beautiful in all seasons-with lovely fall color from witch hazels, American beech and sweet gum and incredible spring wildflowers. Woodland and meadow birds alike can be observed. Look for scarlet tanagers, wood thrushes and field sparrows.

Boots are recommended after rainy periods.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Jacob's Creek Trail: 1.3 mile and quarter mile sections (both one way)

Jacob's Creek Trail: 1 mile, one way Location: Pennington-Titusville Road, approximately 0.7 miles from Bear Tavern Road (CR 579) Interactive directions. Interactive directions

The Jacobs Creek Trail consists of a main trail north of Pennington-Titusville Road which is approximately 1.3 mile and quarter mile sections (both one way) and a shorter trail south of Pennington-Titusville Road which is approximately a quarter mile each way. The northern features panoramic views from a ridge above the creek where it traverses mature woods. The trail also traverses younger successional woods on lowland sections closer to the creek. The southern trail offers delightful close-up views of the historic creek. Much of the area was farmed many years ago and remnants of old farm roads still exist. One historic feature of note along the northern trails is the ruins of an old five foot high stone wall, presumably built as a dam for ice production. Nearby is what appears to be small quarry where stone for the wall was obtained.

The entrances to the Jacob Creek Trail are marked with green signs saying "Jacobs Creek Trail." Major portions of the northern trail go through private property on which easements for public access are held by Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space. Hunting activity is variable on the entire trail, so please look for signage that indicates changes in hunting activity. However, the entire trail is open on Sundays only for hiking, including the portions on private lands from mid-September to mid-February.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Kulak and Lawrence Preserves: 0.9 mile one way

Elks Preserve: 1.2 mile loop Location (mulitple access points): Kulak Preserve - Featherbed Lane, 0.4 miles west of Rileyville Road Lawrence Preserve - Mountain Church Road, 1.4 miles west of Rileyville Road. Interactive directions

This trail travels through three preserved parcels in the Sourland Mountain region. Begin the hike at the Featherbed Lane parking lot on the Kulak Preserve (FoHVOS and D&R Greenway co-owned), where the trail crosses a meadow and enters a young forest. Heading north, the trail enters the Double Crossing Preserve (D&R Greenway) and finally crosses a Stony Brook tributary and enters the Lawrence Preserve (FoHVOS). The Stony Brook corridor features a mature forest of tulip trees, sugar maple and Christmas fern. After rain events, the stream crossing can be difficult.

There is no formal parking for the Lawrence Preserve. Park along Mountain Church Road.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Nayfield Preserve: 1.5 mile loop

Nayfield Preserve: 1.5 mile loop Location: Route 518, approximately one mile west of State Route 31. Interactive directions

The Nayfield Preserve trail meanders through a wet meadow, beech, oak, and ash forests, and an abandoned white pine plantation. Spring is especially abundant at Nayfield Preserve when toothwort, mayapples and bloodroot bloom. Witch hazel, maple leaf viburnum and blackhaw viburnum create Nayfield's understory. Rest by the stream and listen for waterthrushes.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Skyview Preserve: 1.4 mile loop

Skyview Preserve: 1.4 mile loop Location: Marshall's Corner-Woodsville Road, approximately one-half mile from Lambertville-Hopewell Road (CR 518) Interactive directions

The preserve was primarily used for agriculture in the past. Portions of Woodsville Brook and Stony Brook run through the preserve. Please enjoy the spur trail that takes you to a bench by the stream. This is a nice spot to relax and enjoy the sounds of moving water. The preserve is made up of meadows and forest and the trail winds through both. Along the trail that runs through the meadows, you will see a variety of wildflowers and small trees. You may also see numerous birds and insects, especially in summer and fall.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.

Ted Stiles Preserve at Baldpate Mountain: 10 miles of trails

Location:
Trails having direct access to roadways with parking are as follows: Ted Stiles Preserve at Baldpate Mountain is Hopewell Township's largest contiguous forest and is home to an array of native plant communities and wildlife. Interior nesting birds, such as Kentucky warblers, scarlet tanagers and ovenbirds can be heard during breeding season. Trails take hikers through diverse topography through mature forest and open meadows. Benches at the top of the mountain offer a view of the Delaware River. Please click here for additional information about hiking at Ted Stiles Preserve at Baldpate Mountain, including parking, directions, trail maps, and hunting dates.

Thompson Preserve: 1.6 mile loop

Thompson Preserve: 1.6 mile loop Location: Pennington-Hopewell Road (CR 654) Approximately 0.6 mile from Route 31. Interactive directions

The preserve was primarily farmed at one time but the majority of the land has returned to forest of red maple and ash. Remaining agricultural fields (17 acres) are being farmed by an organic farmer. In the summer of 2010, FoHVOS began an 8.5 acre meadow restoration project which can be seen from the trail. The trail is a loop that takes you along the organic farm fields, then splits either into the forest or along the fields. Please note that there is a bridge missing over a steep ravine. Take precautions when climbing up and down the ravine, or go back the way you came.

Click here to download an aerial map with trails.



2013/2014 Deer Management Program and Public Access Limitations tax incentive program 2011 Strategic Plan Private Lands Stewardship Program